history

Mount St Mary's
Mount St Mary’s College near Sheffield has appointed an archivist to examine and share the large amount of historical material collected by the college in its 175 years.Samantha Palmer, who started work last November, said “there is a huge amount of historical information locked away in the archives and my role is now to make it accessible to current pupils and their families, to Old Mountaineers and to local people interested in the history of the area.”As most of the records are uncatalogued...
Titus Oates - An exact discovery
An interesting article in The Independent on 7 August 2017 put ‘fake news’ into a deeper historical context.Its author, Linda Kiernan, a lecturer in French history at Trinity College Dublin, focused on the febrile climate of 17th Century Europe. At a time when civil wars and unrest beset Western Europe, in Britain the widely believed ‘fake news’ (known as the Popish Plot) was that the Jesuits were planning to do away with Charles II in favour of his Catholic younger brother, James. With...
  On 25 October 1970, Pope Paul VI canonized 40 martyrs of the English Reformation. Among those were 6 welsh priests, religious and lay people, whose suffering we remember on their feast day on the anniversary of their canonization.    Richard Gwyn:Gwyn was born in Montgomeryshire c1537. After a time at Oxford and Cambridge Universities and then Douai, he returned to Wales and became a teacher in Wrexham. There he married his wife Catherine and they had 3 surviving...
Until 31 March next year, the St John Paul II National Shrine in Washington is hosting a unique exhibition, God’s Servant First: The Life and Legacy of Thomas More, which will showcase over 60 artefacts, most of which come from Stonyhurst College. The objects on display include a first folio by William Shakespeare, a hat owned by More, a chasuble embroidered by Katherine of Aragon, and relics of More and John Fisher, Bishop of Rochester, who was executed for treason 2...
  This September marks the 150th anniversary of St Aloysius' College at Garnethill, Glasgow. The Society of Jesus was first approached with the idea of running a parish and establishing a school for the education of boys in Glasgow in 1859. In that same year, they took over the running of the parish of St Joseph in North Woodside Road and were also offered a house on Charlotte Street in the Bridgetown area of the city which would serve as the intended school. However in the...
Black and white photograph of Fr Augustus Law SJ
This year marks the 140th anniversary of the completion of St Aidan’s College in South Africa. At its opening, 31 January 1867, the community consisted of three Jesuit priests and three Jesuit brothers. In this blog post we remember the life of Fr Augustus Law, one of those founding Fathers.  Augustus Law was born 21 October 1833 and entered the Society 15 January 1854 after a career in the navy, during which he converted to Catholicism. In the ten years between entering the...
Photo by Jack Dorsey at flickr.com
‘The size of Shakespeare’s vocabulary was a direct reflection of what he wrote about – which was virtually everything.’ For the 400th anniversary of the playwright’s death, David Crystal explains why counting the number of words in the Shakespearean canon can never be an exact science. Nevertheless, we can still identify the semantic field of which Shakespeare made more use than any other: religious language. There is a striking numerical parallel between...
Map of Armenia and Turkey
Pope Francis’ referral earlier this year to the Armenian ‘genocide’ provoked ‘disappointment and sadness’ in Turkey, where such an interpretation of the events of 1915 is refuted. Why is the use of that word by the pope and others such a source of distress in Turkey?  Jean-Marc Balhan SJ unpacks the historical and contemporary context of the Turkish reaction. Many were astonished at the reaction from the Turkish authorities when, on 12 April, Pope Francis...
Portrait of Richard III
2012 saw the startling discovery in Leicester of the skeleton of King Richard III, who was defeated by Henry Tudor and killed in battle at Bosworth Field in 1485.  On Thursday 26 March, his remains will be reinterred in Leicester Cathedral. Jane Hellings asks how kindly Richard has been treated by popular history and wonders what the Catholic king would make of his Protestant burial. Richard III is best known to us as the eponymous protagonist of Shakespeare’s shameless...
From ‘Portrait of Queen Elisabeth I’ by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger
At the juncture at which we leave Hilary Mantel’s tale as Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies conclude, there has been a rupture in the relationship between England and Rome. But this was by no means the end of the story. Daniel Kearney takes us forward to the reign of Elizabeth I and explores the how the early Jesuits tried to preserve Catholicism in Tudor England. The expense is reckoned, the enterprise is begun; it is of God, it cannot be withstood.  So the faith was planted:...

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