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Frederick Copleston was born in Taunton on 10 April 1907 and educated at Marlborough College. In 1925 he was received into the Catholic Church at Devizes, going up to St. John’s College, Oxford to study Classics the same year. After leaving Oxford in 1929, Freddie entered the seminary at Oscott, but after a year he decided to enter the Jesuit novitiate in Roehampton. He was ordained at Heythrop in 1937, and completed his tertianship at Sentmaringer, Munster in 1938-1939.In 1939 he...
Alexander Briant was born in Somerset, England on 17th August 1556, and studied at Harts Hall in Oxford. While there, he became a pupil of Father Robert Parsons and he completed his studies with him at Balliol College, which, along with his association with Richard Holtby, led to Briant’s conversion to Catholicism. He followed Holtby to the English Seminary College at Reims, France, and was ordained priest on 29th March 1578. He was assigned to the English mission in August 1579 to work...
As a young Jesuit I first came to Campion Hall in 1958 to read Greats. Since then, I  studied theology at Heythrop College, out in the country near Chipping Norton as it then was. As soon as I was ordained, I set off for the University of Michigan (on the advice of a couple of my old Greats tutors) to do a doctorate in philosophy and embark on what was to be most of my adult life! By the time I finished at Michigan, Heythrop had become one of the colleges of London University, and I very...
  Video of Rev'd James Hanvey, SJ Intro Media Folder: Media RootCampion Hall is part of the University of Oxford, one of six 'Permanent Private Halls'. Each of these Halls and the University’s 37 Colleges provide a social and academic community with its own particular style and traditions for members of the wider University. Campion Hall is also the Jesuit Community in Oxford. It was founded in 1896 as a house of studies, intended mainly for members of the Society of Jesus...
I was born in London in 1954, and educated at Bishop Challoner School in Beckenham and by the Jesuits at St John's Beaumont and Stonyhurst College. I then read English at Merton College, Oxford, before entering the Jesuit novitiate in 1977. I studied philosophy and theology at Heythrop College, University of London, punctuated by a year of pastoral work in Mexico. Before ordination in 1985, I also did a masters degree, specialising in Jesuit history, at what was then Weston School of...
Born in London on 24 January 1540. Campion studied at Christ’s Hospital and St. John’s College, Oxford, receiving a Master’s degree in 1564. In 1568 he was ordained deacon as an Anglican. In Ireland between 1569 and 1571, he subsequently travelled to Douai, France, to become a Catholic. The English College, Douai awarded him a BD in 1573. Campion next went to Rome, where he entered the Society. After novitiate in Moravia, he was ordained, and spent six years teaching rhetoric...
Have you ever met a red-haired Tanzanian? Well, now you have! My father worked for UNESCO as a teacher-trainer. This meant that, as a family, we had the opportunity of living in the most wonderful countries. Having been born in Dar es Salaam I grew up in Fiji in the South Pacific. You can imagine my confusion aged eight on arriving at the Jesuit school of Stonyhurst in deepest, darkest Lancashire. “There must be some mistake. My parents must have lost their senses … beaches, palm trees, the...
I am the Assistant Editor of The Way: I manage the journal's office at Campion Hall in Oxford, as well as its website and online bookshop. I am a member of the Editorial Board and am involved in all stages of preparing articles and reviews for press. I also do the editorial work on our regular book publications. I started working for The Way part time when I was a student, then alongside work at the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography and the Oxford English Dictionary, going full time in...
My name is Nicholas King, and I was born in Bath in 1947. After I left school, I went up to Oxford to read Classics, with the firm intention of becoming a wealthy barrister after that. However at a particular moment, which I can date to within a few minutes, and greatly to my surprise, I realised that the only thing that I could do if I was to be happy was to join the Jesuits, who had taught me at Stonyhurst. That was 47 years ago, and (so far) I have seen no reason to change my mind…...
The Jesuits I first encountered in books worked in seemingly neglected fields of the Church’s life.  From the twentieth century, they were the French Jesuit palaeontologist, Teilhard de Chardin who also reflected on how his scientific understanding was woven into his faith and his experience of God; Cardinal  Augustin Bea helped Pope John XXIII develop the Church’s ecumenical dialogue to renew our friendship with Christians separated from the Catholic Church; Rutilio Grande, ...

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