poverty

Manchester Central Foodbank, the first student-led foodbank in the country, was established almost five years ago as a project of the Manchester Universities’ Catholic Chaplaincy. Over the last five years the foodbank has provided food for over 14,300 individuals, of whom over 5,400 were children. And in the last six months alone it has provided food for over 2,000 people, of whom over 700 were children.As the fifth anniversary approaches, foodbank manager Amy Wisenfeld was asked if she could...
“For me, making the link between poverty and the health of the natural world is one of the most important things we have to do this century.” So says wildlife broadcaster and environmental campaigner Mary Colwell, as she prepares to deliver a lecture in Glasgow. One of the many marvels of nature is that it is generally incredibly resilient,” she continues.  “It gives back in abundance if we allow it room.  The challenge is demonstrating these connections to...
Education is one of the most critical areas of empowerment for women, according to the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). Among children not attending school in the developing world, there are twice as many girls as boys, and among illiterate adults there are twice as many women as men. However, studies strongly suggest that when women have the opportunity to gain an education a wide variety of positive things begin to happen.These issues will be addressed by Sr Lynne Baron FCJ on 9...
Poverty in Scotland is the focus of the first lecture in a series of lectures at St Aloysius College in Glasgow, which starts next Tuesday. The Centre for Social and Environmental Justice at the Jesuit school will welcome Sir Harry Burns, former Chief Medical Officer for Scotland, who will look at the health problems facing Scotland in his lecture entitled The Biology of Poverty.“More than 250,000 people aren't properly fed, according to the Poverty and Social Exclusion project,...
Jesuits are neither monks nor friars but ‘clerks regular’. They take vows of poverty, chastity and obedience and live in community. Most are priests but there have always been Jesuit brothers who assist the mission of the Society without ordination. Many Jesuit priests also take a fourth vow, unique to the Society of Jesus, of special obedience to the Pope with regard to missions.Jesuits today continue to be inspired by the vision of their founder, St Ignatius. His plan for the order's way of...
Fr Dermot Preston SJ reflects on the place of the vows in the life of a Jesuit. He has worked as a Jesuit in Britain,  South Africa and Guyana and is now Provincial of the Jesuits in Britain.When I was a novice we used to recite this helpful little meditation:“Poverty – to be free, as He was freeChastity – to love generously, as He lovedObedience – to live a life of service, as He served.”As these words illustrate, the contours of the vows are not narrowly...
There is no doubt that in the eyes of many in the world today, a vowed life of Poverty, Chastity and Obedience seems like madness! No Jesuit would deny the challenge of this life. We cannot live this way without the help of God’s grace. But we embrace it knowing that for us it is a path of life, a way of uniting ourselves with, and witnessing to, Christ in our world.In poverty, we become free to share the life of the poor and to use whatever resources we have for the service of othersIn...