remembrance

Later this week, 8-9 of May to be exact, marks the annual international day of remembrance and reconciliation for those who lost their lives during the Second World War. These days – first designated by the United Nations General Assembly in 2004 - urge individuals, UN Member States and organisation to pay tribute to the victims of World War II annually on either one of or both days. The 8th May was designated, naturally, as this was the day when, almost 75 years ago the World War II Allies...
Vietnam War Memorial
Jesus’s words to the daughters of Jerusalem, ‘who were beating their breasts and wailing for him’, can help us think about what we are doing on Remembrance Sunday, suggests James Crampsey SJ. The names of those who have lost their lives in conflict have the power to demand something of us: ‘There is a whole way of seeing and remembering that creates an image of war that summons us to peace.’ At the end of the First World War, whose centenary we commemorate at this time, a list was compiled...
Book of remembrance at Farm St Church
1918-2018  We will remember them Solemn requiem mass to remember the dead on the centenary of the armistice which ended the First World War.All welcome to join the congregation to mark this important anniversary, to remember those who have died in all wars, and all our departed loved ones.
This week we remember those who have served their country in war.Jesuits have served as Military Chaplains in successive conflicts, and in the Jesuits in Britain Archive we have records of Jesuits who served in the British military as Chaplains in the Crimean and later wars.  We have written about some of these before; Chaplains of the Crimean War, Jesuits at Gallipoli, and Two 1916 World War One Chaplains.During the First World War a total of 84 Jesuits from the English Province served as...
Poppies credit Laura Goodsell
November is the month of the dead. We remembered the Holy Souls the day after we celebrated the Feast of All Saints. Then on Remembrance Sunday next week we remember all those who have died in two world wars and in the many sad wars waged and waging since then, with so much suffering, so many deaths, so many refugees forced to leave their country and their home.We may be far removed now from those two “Great Wars”, though we are still continuing to commemorate the centenary of the First World...
‘Before we embark on this showcase of memory at this centenary of appalling violence, it is a good thing to ask: What are we about to do? What is a correct orientation to all of this?’ Nathan Koblintz uses the poetry of Edward Thomas, who wrote during, but rarely about, the First World War, to think critically about the act of remembrance.  The words of an Ignatian prayer offer us a spiritual ideal for remembering the War – how does Thomas’s poetry come close to...