conspiracy

There have been a number of conspiracy theories which originated in America and accuse the Jesuits of schemes against the US government.  Perhaps the most bizarre of these concerned the conspiracy to sink the Titanic. The Jesuits and a group of US financiers supposedly plotted the sinking in order to do away with certain enemies to their scheme to set the Federal Reserve. These included Benjamin Guggenheim, Isador Strauss and John Jacob Astor who all perished on the Titanic. ...
The French Revolution, and the regicide and terror which followed in its wake, were to contemporaries around Europe, the most shocking events of all history. After the French Revolution a lot of head-scratching went into explaining what had happened. The scale of the events and the change to French society suggested that there was a higher explanation than those living throught he events could discern.Augustin Barruel, a former French Jesuit who sought refuge England from 1792, wrote an...
There were two separate forces behind the Popish Plot (known to some Catholics as the Presbyterian Plot).  One was political. For many years the old Cromwellian Lord Shaftesbury and the puritan (Whig) faction had been stoking the fires of religious hatred against Catholics and France, in a long game to end absolute monarchy and once again to depose a king. Charles II openly favoured religious toleration of Catholics.  This meant a significant minority in parliament always voted with...
 The Gunpowder Plot was a failed assassination attempt against King James 1 by a group of English Catholics led by Robert Catesby.  Many English Catholics had hoped that the death of Elizabeth 1 and the accession of James in 1603 would lead to a relenting of harsh penalties for recusancy.  Because Elizabeth had not formally named James as her successor, and to counter the efforts of influential Catholics like Robert Persons, James did some skilled political maneuvering with the...
Why have the Jesuits been associated with conspiracies over the years?  Back in 1540 they were an innovative order, distinctly different from the familiar Benedictines, Franciscans and Dominicans.  Like many new and different initiatives they attracted suspicion from the establishment.Unlike all previous orders in the Catholic Church they had no regular habit or uniform.  As contemplatives in action they roamed the world, the intersections, going where the need was greatest....