Laudato si'

Photo by Joshua Earle via Unsplash
In St Augustine’s description of his ministry, he said that: ‘The turbulent have to be corrected, the faint-hearted cheered up, the weak supported; the Gospel's opponents need to be refuted, its insidious enemies guarded against; the unlearned need to be taught, the indolent stirred up, the argumentative checked; the proud must be put in their place, the desperate set on their feet, those engaged in quarrels reconciled; the needy have to be helped, the oppressed to be liberated...
To instruct the ignorant
In this Jubilee Year of Mercy, Pope Francis has called for Lent to be ‘lived more intensely as a privileged moment to celebrate and experience God’s mercy.’[1] Thinking Faith will respond to this invitation by offering a series of reflections on the Seven Spiritual Works of Mercy in the context of Laudato si’. We begin by asking what it means to ‘instruct the ignorant’. ‘Ignorant’ is not a word with which most of us would like to be...
Our exploration of the key concerns of our local community in the light of Catholic Social Teaching will continue this autumn with a focus on Pope Francis' Encyclical Letter on human ecology.There are still places available for our next seminar on Pope Francis' encyclical letter Laudato Si'. Henry Longbottom SJ who tweets @greenjesuit will speak about environmental sustainability.Come at 6pm for food and the presentation will be at 6.30pm. After discussion in small groups and time for...
Photograph of flooding in Bangladesh
In August 2015, several Islamic institutions and individuals came to together to issue an important new document about the urgent challenges posed by climate change. Damian Howard SJ outlines the vision and significance of the Islamic Declaration on Climate Change, which explores new interpretations of the Qur’an. How much common ground is to be found between this declaration and Pope Francis’ encyclical, Laudato si’? Christianity is not the only world religion getting to...
On care for our common homeOur short series of talks given by Jesuits based on issues arising from Pope Francis’ encyclical continues with Henry Longbottom SJ:How do we put Laudato Si into practice?  From environmental advocacy to greening church buildings.The talk will be followed by a time for questions and open discussion. Tea and coffee will be available.
The Hurtado invitation
You are warmly invited to join a series of three evening events exploring the issues presented in Laudato Si’, Pope Francis’ encyclical letter on human ecology.Pope Francis has written a small book covering controversial issues at the roots of our global ecological crisis, such as technology, consumerism, education and spirituality. It has attracted much interest internationally and in the media. His message invites us to change the way we live and respond to new challenges for looking after...
The latest issue (volume 54 no 4) of The Way has been published and is available now. Each issue has one article made freely available. This month's is from Pedro Walpole: Do Not Be Afraid: Laudato Si’ and Integral EcologyWriting from the perspective of Asia Pacific, Pedro Walpole sees in Laudato si’ a call to restore a sense of what is enough to human living, avoiding unsustainable over-consumption. One way to foster this is to deepen the bonds of solidarity between people living in...
Picture of Pope Francis
On Friday 25 September, Pope Francis will address the UN General Assembly in New York, whose members will be discussing many of the issues that the pope addressed earlier this year in Laudato si’. Climate scientists Ottmar Edenhofer and Christian Flaschland give a detailed analysis of the ground-breaking encyclical, its place in church tradition and its dialogue with current climate science. How is Pope Francis challenging the Church and the world? Pope Francis’ long-awaited...
Cafod launches new animated resource on the climate
As part of their range of resources for secondary schools, CAFOD has produced a new, four minute animation that explores Pope Francis’ message to every person on the planet asking them to protect our common home.In his open letter, Laudato Si’, Pope Francis speaks about the devastating effects of climate change on people and the planet saying that climate change is real, urgent and it must be tackled, asking us to remember that the climate is “a common good, belonging to and meant for us all”....
Photo of animal dominoes
Faith-based discussions about ecological issues often revolve around a theme of stewardship, but Pope Francis has taken a different approach in his encyclical, says Henry Longbottom SJ. How does the ecological conversion to which Laudato si’ calls us compare with a movement in secular philosophy which advocates an environmental virtue ethics? There's a striking absence of ‘stewardship’ language in Pope Francis’ recent encyclical, Laudato si’. The term,...

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