Peter Gallagher SJ

Man in front of fire Credit Mohamed Nohassi
          It was blazing but it was not being burnt. God spoke to Moses from the intensity of a fire which burns brightly but does not consume. God made himself present in a conflagration which was not a destruction.On the Third Sunday of Lent we meditate on God’s presence in our life, on what he is saying to us. We pray to the Lord who purifies us without destroying us. God loves us all intensely. He speaks to us sometimes amid what we might...
Transfiguration of Jesus Credit Armando Alemdar Ara
Peter Gallagher SJ reflects on how the glory of God can give energy to our Lenten journey.         Peter and his companions were heavy with sleep.  We know this feeling.  We are sometimes very tired.  Our weariness affects our view of Lent.  We would like to live the best possible Lent but energy can be lacking. At the same time, we are not so torpid or so short of spiritual ambition that we would not like Lent to go well. Weary...
Road crossing instructions credit NeONBRAND
           My father was a wandering Aramaean said Moses, taking stock.  He was grateful to have arrived in a land of milk and honey and now looked back to see how the goodness and generosity of God had placed him in this excellent situation, conscious of how far he had come. My father went down into Egypt, to take refuge there, insignificant, but there became great, mighty and strong, despite harsh treatment. We all have...
Potters wheel Credit Balaji Malliswamy via Unsplash
             Keep on working at the Lord’s work always, knowing that, in the Lord, you cannot be labouring in vain. 1 Corinthians 15 encourages us as we turn our thoughts to Lent which begins this week on Ash Wednesday. Lent is the Lord’s workOur plans concern what we might do, what we might renounce and how we might open ourselves to the grace of God this Lent. We are looking forward to a time of fruitful cooperation with...
‘Count to ten before replying.’  This is an old recipe for putting a brake on anger.  The picture is of an emotion which is very hard to control but which can just about be kept in check by extraordinary measures.  To the problem of how to cope with anger the Gospel suggests a very surprising solution: to the person who slaps you on one cheek, present the other cheek too.From the practical point of view, this peaceful response to something which could readily have provoked...
Man jumping at the end of a pier by the sea Credit Alesso Lin
            ‘A happy release’, ‘She is better off where she is now’,  ‘He is out of his trouble’:  with such comforting phrases we point a contrast between this life and the future one when someone who has been very ill has at last died. It is right that those who have been in terrible pain should be relieved of it. Now, at the very least, they will be able enjoy the absence of their sufferings.Happy are you who weep now...
Man looking at waves Credit Gianluca Zuccarelli
           Leave me Lord I am a sinful manSimon Peter often misses the point. Here he might seem to us to be lacking that self-esteem which is surely essential for achievement, including success in sharing with others the good news of God’s love for us all.  Love your neighbour, as yourself  we hear elsewhere in the Scriptures and are glad to know that love of self is not only permitted but is also a measure for our treatment and...
Credit Alexandra Marcu via Unsplash
Can we embrace everything that happens to us as the will of God?   Can we give wholehearted thanks for the good things which happen?   Can we accept and endure what is difficult, grateful even for our troubles?   God is watching over us but also teaching us.  The divine plan is coming to fruition and in the meantime some are suffering for the sake of a great good which God can see but we, for the moment, may not. This lack of present understanding is part of...
Is Jesus’ mission to fulfil the Word of God so different from our highest hopes of justice in the world and of happiness for ourselves and those dear to us? Peter Gallagher SJ reflects. Fulfilment. Among our holy purposes in worshipping God is the seeking of fulfilment. We seek to be fulfilled by our participation in what happens in our prayer and sacrifice. There is fulfilment in the presence of Christ in Holy Communion. There is fulfilment in the Word of God. There is fulfilment in the...
Mosaic by Fr Marko Rupnik SJ from the National Shrine of St John Paul II
He let his glory be seen.  The miracle at Cana is an epiphany of Christ. Jesus lets his glory be seen. We taste his divinity, and it delights us. In Psalm 100  we hear the phrase The Lord is sweet and elsewhere in Scripture the invitation comes Taste and see that the Lord is sweet.  Holy Communion, sweet sacrament divine, also teaches us that the Lord gives himself to us in a way that is nourishing and cheering.  ‘The Lord is sweet’.  Too sweet?  The connoisseurs...

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