Reformation

On 31 October 1517, Martin Luther nailed his Ninety-Five Theses to the door of All Saints' Church in Wittenberg – or so the story goes. Although this part of the story is likely to be myth, the year 1517 was to be a turning point in history. In that year Luther’s Theses, originally sent to the Archbishop of Mainz in protest of the sale of indulgences, were printed in several locations across Germany; in January 1518 they were translated from Latin to German, and within two weeks, copies had...
Church of St James the Less and St Helen Colchester
Which Essex town boasts a church that shares an architect with London’s best-known Jesuit church; a familial link with one of the first and most famous English Jesuits; and the origins of a ship that transported Jesuits imprisoned under the Elizabethan regime to freedom? If it surprises you to learn that the answer is Colchester, then a new ‘Tour of Catholic Colchester’ will reveal all, and tell you much more about the town’s religious history.The Colchester Catholic Heritage Group, the shrine...
Sir Thomas More by Hans Holbein the Younger. Commons Wikipedia
The Curator of the Collections at Stonyhurst College will be helping to launch a major exhibition in Washington DC this week, on the life and legacy of St Thomas More. More than 60 relics and artefacts will be on display at the Saint John Paul II National Shrine for the exhibition entitled God’s Servant First: The Life and Legacy of Thomas More. Between now and the end of March 2017, it will aim to bring to life the courageous witness of the Catholic martyr whom Pope John Paul II declared...
Robert Southwell SJ
On 1 December, the Society of Jesus celebrates the feast of a number of English Jesuit reformation martyrs, among them Saints Edmund Campion and Robert Southwell.  Southwell is perhaps best known for his poetry, to which Brian McClorry SJ offers an introduction here. How does Southwell’s poetry open up a space for Ignatian conversational prayer? Clive James once provocatively remarked that poetry is ‘any piece of writing that can’t be quoted except out of context’. If poetry drowns in...
Peter Canisius
27 April is the Feast of Saint Peter Canisius. In 1897, Pope Leo XIII issued an encyclical to mark the 300th anniversary of Canisius’s death, in which he referred to the Jesuit as, ‘after Boniface…the second apostle of Germany’[i]. What did he do to earn such a title? Peter Canisius was born in the Netherlands in 1521. Like many characters of his time, he defied his parents’ wishes in order to study theology, and he was initially strongly influenced in that...